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Still have questions about using cannabis in Washington state? We can help with that.

 

Know This About Cannabis campaign

Know This About Cannabis is a campaign from the Washington State Department of Health. We’re out to educate adults 21 and over about the risks, rules, and responsibilities of retail, or non-medical, cannabis use in Washington state.

The campaign is brought to you by the Marijuana Prevention and Education Program within the Prevention and Community Health Division at the Washington State Department of Health. The funding for this campaign comes directly from cannabis revenues as initially laid out in Initiative 502 (I-502) and now specified in RCW 69.50.540.

To learn more about medically authorized cannabis use, please visit the Washington State Department of Health website.

Frequently asked questions

What is cannabis?

Cannabis—also known as marijuana, pot, herb, bud, weed, grass, chronic, dank, dope, ganga, and kush—comes from the hemp plant cannabis sativa or cannabis indica.

There are four main types of cannabis products

Flower
A mixture of dried, shredded leaves, stems, seeds, and flowers of the hemp plant. Flower is typically smoked.

Concentrate
A potent extract of cannabinoids from the cannabis plant. You can consume concentrates orally (RSO), through vaporizing, or dabbing (shatter, wax, budder).

Edibles
A cannabis-infused food product, such as a cookie, cracker, mint, chocolate, or drink. Be aware: Edibles have a delayed effect, sometimes lasting several hours, which may cause users to consume too much because they believe the drug is not working. This can cause a user to overdose or have a negative experience.

Topical
A cannabis-infused lotion, balm, or oil absorbs through the skin. Topical cannabis products are not psychoactive and will not get a user high.

What are the main chemicals in cannabis?

Cannabis has more than 400 chemicals. The two most prominently discussed, studied, and understood chemicals are THC and CBD.

THC
THC, or delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, is the main active chemical in cannabis and is what causes a person to feel high.

CBD
CBD, or cannabidiol, is the non-psychoactive chemical in cannabis. Overall, we’ll need more research to fully understand all the impacts of CBD.

Has cannabis potency increased?

Changes in the way cannabis is grown and processed have dramatically increased its potency in the last 50 years. Cannabis-infused products, such as baked goods and sodas, are often stronger than smoked cannabis. Concentrates, such as hash oil, have the highest amount of THC.

What should I do if my child accidentally consumes cannabis?

If your child accidentally consumes cannabis or cannabis-infused products, contact the Washington Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222. If the symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to an emergency room.

What should I do if my pet consumes cannabis?

Cannabis can be harmful to your pet. If you think your pet has consumed cannabis, contact the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 1-888-426-4435.

Where can I find information on medical marijuana?

For more information on medical marijuana, please visit the Washington State Department of Health website.

I don’t do drugs. Why am I seeing Know This About Cannabis ads?

The Know This About Cannabis campaign aims to educate adults 21 years of age and older about the risks, rules, and responsibilities of retail, or non-medical, cannabis use in Washington state. We have no way of knowing whether or not you use cannabis.

Where do you get your information?

Our information comes from many sources—like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the American Medical Association, and the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

We also use information from many of our partners, including the University of Washington’s Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute, the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board, Washington Traffic Safety Commission, the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, and the Washington Poison Center.

If you’re curious about a specific piece of information, all sources are cited or linked when referenced.

Can cannabis be beneficial?

Washington State has legalized medical marijuana. For a lot of people, cannabis is an effective way to treat or manage a health condition. To learn more about medical marijuana, please talk to your health care provider.

Helpful contacts and resources

Our partners have posted additional information on cannabis use in Washington state.

Learn About Marijuana WA
Managed by the University of Washington’s Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute, this site provides information on consumer cannabis dependence and avenues for cessation. It also provides resources, like e-learning modules, fact sheets, and tools for consumers, parents, and prevention partners.

Start Talking Now
Managed by the Washington Healthy Youth Coalition and the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, this site serves as a source of information for parents and influential adults when talking to young people about the risks and consequences of using cannabis.

Washington Poison Center
Managed by the Washington Poison Center, this site provides immediate, free, and expert treatment advice and assistance in case of exposure to poisonous, hazardous, or toxic substances.

Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board
Managed by the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board, this site provides information on the cannabis industry, laws and rules, consumer safety, youth prevention, and harm reduction.

Washington Traffic Safety Commission
Managed by the Washington Traffic Safety Commission, this site provides information on traffic safety laws in Washington state, community involvement opportunities, and additional resources for all of your traffic safety needs.

You Can
Managed by the Washington State Department of Health, this site specifically educates youth about the risks and consequences of using cannabis.

If you or someone you know needs help with substance abuse, contact the Washington Recovery Help Line or call 1-866-789-1511.

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